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News — Academics

University Announces Gerontology Initiatives

Faculty and students at Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University are using research, teaching and service programs to address the many issues and opportunities facing our local aging population – including using a recently acquired grant from the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) to teach computer classes to area seniors.

The University was chosen from an applicant pool of more than 90 institutions to receive a $12,000 grant from the CIC's Intergenerational Connections: Students Serving Older Adults program, supported by the AARP Foundation. The award will be used to fund service-learning Fellowships for students to serve 55 senior adult residents of the Our Lady of the Lake Senior HUD apartments. The Fellows will be instructing the senior adults on basic computer skills, the use of internet sites to access medical and other information of interest, social media to communicate with family and friends, and Microsoft Word to create narratives for the Elderly Housing newsletter and other written pieces.

"With almost 20 percent of Louisiana's population over the age of 60, it is imperative that our institution makes caring for our senior population now and in the coming years a priority," said Tina Holland, PhD, Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University president. "Through programs that promote health at all ages and serve Louisiana seniors through service-learning projects, we can make a long-term positive impact on the lives of many local seniors."​

In line with this focus, Lindsay B. Mullins, BSN, MSN-FNP, PhD has been promoted to the Sister Agnes Marie Fitzsimons Endowed Chair of Gerontology, where she will organize and support multidisciplinary participation in gerontological studies at the University. She will draw upon her experience as a nurse scholar and as the Family Nurse Practitioner program director to promote health and quality of life for elders in the region through continued research on building community capacity to promote healthy aging, and by positively impacting Louisiana's nursing workforce and the education surrounding elderly care.

Dr. Mullins has been with the University in various capacities since 2009, and she also serves as a family nurse practitioner for the Louisiana Sleep Foundation. She previously served as a charge nurse at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C., from 2001-2005 and as a family nurse practitioner at Methodist Hospital in Dallas from 2005-2006.

She received her bachelor of science in nursing from LSU Health Sciences Center In 2001 and her master's degree as a family nurse practitioner in 2004 from Georgetown University School of Nursing. She completed her studies with a doctorate from LSU's Peabody College of Education in 2010.


Dr. Amy Hall Named New Dean of the School of Nursing

Amy Hall, RN, PhD, CNE has joined the team at Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University as the school’s new Dean of the School of Nursing, bringing nearly 30 years of nursing and education experience to the role. Dr. Hall is responsible for strengthening and streamlining academic policies and procedures related to the School of Nursing, and she will also oversee the assessment of teaching and learning, develop new academic programs, and promote and foster leadership development within the School of Nursing.

"As a nurse scholar, educator, administrator, and forward-thinking leader, Dr. Amy Hall is extraordinarily well-suited to be the School of Nursing’s next dean," said Tina Holland, PhD, Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University President. “Her collaborative and innovative approach to nursing education and research makes her just the right fit for this leadership role as the university continues to build and sustain a culture of academic excellence.”

Dr. Hall comes from University of Evansville in Evansville, Ind., where she most recently served as the White Family Endowed Professor of Nursing since January 2011 in recognition of her contributions to nursing education. She was with the University of Evansville for over 10 years in various positions. She served as an Associate Professor and a PRN Staff Nurse at St. Francis Medical Center and its College of Nursing in Peoria, Ill., prior to her arrival in Evansville.

Dr. Hall is both internationally and nationally recognized in the field of nursing as the co-author of “Essentials for Nursing Practice” and “Fundamentals of Nursing” textbooks published by Mosby-Yearbook-Elsevier. She is very active in creating nursing clinical experiences in the U.K. as part of a study abroad program, and in China with combined emphasis on nursing and health services administration. She also incorporated advanced technology into the nursing program in her previous position by introducing students and faculty to e-books, interaction software and simulation technology in the classrooms and in the nursing labs.

Dr. Hall is a current commissioner for the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing. She is a member of several professional associations including Sigma Theta Tau International and the American Diabetes Association. A certified disaster nurse, Dr. Hall is an active volunteer with the American Red Cross, caring for people affected by disasters and providing disaster nurse certification courses for other nurses.

Dr. Hall received a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Mo., and a master’s in nursing science from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She completed her studies back at Saint Louis University, where she received her PhD in nursing.


White Coat Ceremony for Physician Assistant Class of 2018

Family members, friends, and University faculty and staff gathered on April 1 to honor the Physician Assistant Studies Class of 2018 during the program's White Coat Ceremony. The White Coat Ceremony is a “rite of passage” for students as they begin their clinical phase.

During the ceremony, Dr. Susan Steele-Moses, Interim Dean of the School of Health Professions, and a chosen family member cloaked each student in their first white coat.

The white coat traditionally symbolizes the promise to heal and to care for each and every patient. For our students, the white coat also represents our University’s core values - to serve others "with joyfulness of spirit, and with humility and justice for all those entrusted to our care."

Congratulations to the Class of 2018! 


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